Social and Emotional Learning (SEL)

Community Meeting

What is a Community Meeting?
Community Meeting is a dedicated time and space time built into the day for intentional community-building between students and teachers. Community Meeting is the School District of Philadelphia’s adaptation of what is commonly known as “morning meeting” and should be happening throughout the day with students and staff.

Why focus on Community Meeting?
Research demonstrates that students who feel connected to their teachers and classmates have better attendance, perform better academically, and are more likely to graduate than students who lack those connections. In addition, students with stronger social-emotional skills in areas like relationship-building and social awareness do better in key areas, including behavior, attendance, and academic achievement. Community Meeting is a way to support students’ connection to their schools and their social-emotional development.

What is the recommended time frame and structure of Community Meeting?
Community Meetings typically have four components: 1) greeting 2) sharing 3) activity, and 4) closing. In grades K-8, Community Meetings are suggested to engage students for approximately 20-30 minutes daily. In grades 9-12, schools have flexibility to allot 90 minutes per week to holding Community Meetings for students.

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The School District of Philadelphia has embraced daily Community/Morning meetings as a way to build inclusive and welcoming spaces for all students and staff. We encourage you to consider the sustainability of your meetings and use this sample document to help think through a thematic approach to planning meetings for the year.

Please make a copy to adjust this sample accordingly and revisit this calendar often in group planning time at your school!

The School District of Philadelphia has embraced daily Community/Morning meetings as a way to build inclusive and welcoming spaces for all students and staff. We encourage you to consider the sustainability of your meetings and use this sample document to help think through a thematic approach to planning meetings for the year.

Please make a copy to adjust this sample accordingly and revisit this calendar often in group planning time at your school!

Help us identify Staff who would be willing to allow our team to film their exemplary Community Meetings with their class!

We are looking to record a number of staff (teachers, counselors, etc.) holding Community Meetings in grades K-12 to serve as examples of the ways Community Meeting is having positive impacts on classroom communities.

Click the button below to fill out the form below about yourself or a colleague so that our Social and Emotional Learning team can be in touch about recording an upcoming Community Meeting!

Social, Emotional, and Academic Learning

Click the button below to discover how to implement social and emotional learning harmoniously throughout all policies and practices that impact students’ experiences in and out of school; including academic content and contexts, climate and discipline systems, and Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS).

Example of Aligned SEL and ELA:

  • Academic Standard: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.5)
  • Connections to SEL: Students will need responsible decision-making strategies to monitor their own engagement in brainstorming, writing, requesting feedback from a peer, revising, and editing. They will also need relationship skills to give and receive feedback with peers.
  • Example of Aligned SEL Standards: Monitor progress on achieving a short-term personal goal; Evaluate the application of communication and social skills in daily interactions with peers, teachers, and families. (Illinois State Social Emotional Learning Standards 1C.2b and 2C.5a)
  • Potential SEL Objective: “I can set goals and create a plan related to them” or “ I can effectively give and receive feedback”
  • Frame: Teacher says something like, “Writers! Today you will be moving independently through your writing process. Many of you are ready for an exciting step: getting feedback from a colleague in the class. Think about a time that someone gave you feedback that was really helpful. What did they do?” (Allow for some discussion about what makes feedback effective and palatable). Ask, “What are some things you think will be important to do when giving feedback?” (e.g., “be specific,” “say what worked for you and where you had challenges”). Consider role-playing a quick feedback with a student to model and/or using sentence frames.
  • Coach: Check in with students who are giving one another feedback to see if they are communicating effectively. Notice some positive “feedback moves” students are making that you can share with the class. If students are struggling to give effective feedback, remind them of their strategies.
  • Reflect: Ask students, “What was it like to give feedback? To receive it?” Allow students to share with a partner or journal independently.

(© 2022 CASEL All Rights Reserved. CASEL.org)

Example of Aligned SEL and Math:

  • Academic Standard: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them (CCSS.MATH.PRACTICE.MP1)
  • Connections to SEL: In order to persevere in solving a problem, students will need self-management to work through frustration.
  • Example of Aligned SEL Standard: Individual demonstrates a resilient attitude and growth mindset, even in the face of adversity and challenges. (Rhode Island Social Emotional Learning Standard 2D)
  • Potential SEL Objective: “I can appropriately handle my feelings” (Self-management)
  • Frame: Teacher says something like, “Some of the problems we will be working on today are very challenging. We need challenges to grow, but they can definitely be frustrating! Can anyone remind me what strategies we can use if we are feeling frustrated?” Wait for student responses (take a deep breath, check our self talk, remember our math strategies).
  • Coach: As students work, circulate and notice when students seem to be stuck. Ask them what strategy they will try to get unstuck.
  • Reflect: Ask students, “What was one strategy you used that helped you to persevere today?” Give students a few moments to respond in their journals or share with a partner.

(© 2022 CASEL All Rights Reserved. CASEL.org)

Who We Are

Who We Are

The Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) team serves to provide the foundation for student, school, and district success by providing equitable and strategic guidance for the social and emotional development of all persons within the School District.

We are committed to developing the social and emotional skills of our team members, all District-based leaders and staff, students, and their families through community, relationships, self-reflection, and goal-setting.

Our Team

Jaimie Piotrowicz, Director

Lauren Thomas, Student Learning Specialist (students’ skill development and strategic school-based implementation)

Kendra Jenkins, Adult Learning Specialist (adults’ skill development)

Contact

If you are interested in learning more about Social, Emotional, and Academic Learning, please contact Jaimie Piotrowicz, Director of Social & Emotional Learning, at jpiotrowicz@philasd.org.

If you are interested in learning more about how the Social and Emotional Learning team supports School-Wide SEL, Community Meeting, student-facing SEL, and more please email SEL Specialist, Lauren Thomas at lkthomas@philasd.org.

If you are interested in learning more about how the Social and Emotional Learning team supports adult SEL, mindfulness, stress-management, and more please email SEL Specialist, Kendra Jenkins at kjenkins4@philasd.org.